7 Times Buying Cheap Can Cost More

by Paige Estigarribia
Times Buying Cheap Can Cost More photo

A good buy isn’t always a good buy. Sometimes you need to look past the price tag on that seemingly good bargain to make sure you aren’t making a purchase that will just cost you more money down the road.

Whether it is a discount, coupon code, free shipping offer, or a clearance item, it’s always an added bonus when you run across a good deal on a shopping trip. Finding a way to save money at the store is usually a good thing, right?

But sometimes it also pays to remember that the cheapest products may actually cost more in the long run. Check out these seven examples where buying cheap might end up being more expensive long term.

1. Coats and Jackets

Staying warm during cold weather can make a big difference in winter comfort. When you’re coat shopping, you will probably find a range of prices, styles, materials, and sizes. Do a little research on which materials work best for staying warm and invest in a durable, well-made winter coat. Finding a good winter coat may take a bit of time, but a heavy-duty coat can be a great, long-term way to stay warm and comfortable during cold winter months.

2. Work Clothes

Most people have a set of clothes they wear to work regularly, and it’s definitely a worthwhile investment to pay a little more for clothes that will last. Work clothes usually go through frequent, significant use. Paying more for durability could keep you from buying replacements more often.

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3. Tools

Hand tools are another purchase where it may be wise to pay a little more for durability and long-term use. If it’s a tool that you’ll only use a few times, buy the cheapest import you can find, but if it’s something that you’ll use regularly, you should buy a quality tool. Good tools usually won’t require frequent replacements, and they can generally be used for a long time. Some can even be passed down from generation to generation.

4. Kitchen Cookware and Tools

If you cook a fair amount, then kitchen tools, pots, pans, and baking dishes are probably things you’re using every day in your kitchen. When it comes to durability and quality, most well-made kitchenware can withstand the wear and tear of frequent use. Be it cooking, baking, or serving, a good set of durable pots and pans, well-crafted kitchen tools, and sturdy dishes can make both cooking and clean-up more enjoyable.

5. Furniture

Solid, well-constructed furniture can also be passed down through generations. Antique furniture not only can have sentimental value, but also it can have monetary value. Investing in durable, well-made furniture (especially seating furniture that’s used a lot) is a good way to avoid costly future replacements.

6. Car Maintenance

If you own a vehicle, you know how important it is to keep it regularly serviced and well-maintained. Regular maintenance allows your car to run at an optimum level, but you also likely know that car repairs and maintenance can get really expensive. As tempting as it may be to try and DIY your auto maintenance and repairs, poor car maintenance can actually end up costing more in terms of problems, wear and tear, and additional repairs. Major car repairs and maintenance are usually best left to a skilled mechanic.

7. Paint

If a painting project is on your list, chances are you’ve been eyeing the costs of both the paint and supplies. Both paint and the supplies needed for any painting project can be pricey! Before you decide on a particular type of paint, check the difference in formula and costs. Try to determine whether buying a less expensive brand of paint will mean more time spent painting more coats. Remember if more coats are required, the costs will also be more in the long run.

Reviewed February 2020

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